Human Trafficking Campaign Wrapup

It's been 6 months since I started campaigning on social media against #humantrafficking along with many other citizens. My goal was to help bring awareness of this plague to the mainstream. 

Thank God, this has happened, and so my personal campaign is over, although I will plan to share important news regularly. 

Five metrics of success: 

1) President Donald Trump made it a high priority of his administration from day one. The First Lady and Ivanka Trump are also actively involved.

2) Arrests are *way up* and they're getting high profile individuals in politics & law enforcement. 

3) The federal government is all over it, specifically DHS/ICE & the FBI. (USAID, State & HHS should also be mentioned).

4) The mainstream media is covering it heavily. Daily I see news on the major networks, not just blogs and independent media.

5) A major celebrity, Ashton Kutcher, testified before Congress about his foundation, which fights human trafficking through technology. And Kim Kardashian has announced that she was inspired by the movie Lion to learn more about this issue. 


Just like when I campaigned for President Trump, I was moved to fight this fight for a lot of reasons. I am excited about the next big project, as of now unknown.
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 By Dannielle Blumenthal, Ph.D. All opinions are the author's own; this blog is posted in the author's personal capacity. Available for reuse under Creative Commons 3.0 License. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/.

The Only Brand You'll Ever Need

If I've learned anything over the years, it is that people -- given a choice -- will only work with other people they trust.

The same goes for buying things. I will visit the dollar store weekly. I will buy markers there, shampoo and foil pans and party supplies. I will not buy vitamins, hair dye or "what-a-bargain" iPhone AC adapters.

Speaking of the dollar store, my daughter and I watched a couple shoplift there the other day. It wasn't clear if they were poor, or if they just didn't have the patience to wait.

It may be that the store, being as it was in a "nice area," simply trusted its customers.

Trust is a hard thing to earn, and it's very easily lost. The funny thing is, you can't buy it the way you can buy a good designer.

Have I mentioned that my favorite new brand is water, only because of the package design?

Let's talk about the water for a second: I buy it expecting that there is no special quality about the stuff, despite what they write on the label.

That lack of trust -- it is a kind of trust as well: As long as you, the brand producer or the employer, do not betray me, we're good.

I think about this when I think about corporate communications.

There is always the tug of war.

On the one side there are those who would say as little as possible. They don't want to make promises, they don't want to create liability where before none existed.

On the other there are those who seek the closest possible relationship with the customer. They'll speak in the closest, most confessional tone, about the highlights and the screw-ups alike. Anything to bond the people behind the brand, with the people who consume it.

In the end there is no "one right way" to build trust with the customer. There isn't a magic formula to follow, or a set of five bullet points to always keep in mind.

For me, I begin with a question: Would my mother believe this?

I've used this simple "smell test" for over twenty years.

Never, never once, has it ever proven wrong.

And many times, I didn't listen.

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By Dannielle Blumenthal, Ph.D. All opinions are the author's own; this blog is posted in the author's personal capacity. Available for reuse under Creative Commons 3.0. Public domain photo via Pixabay.





By Dannielle Blumenthal, Ph.D. All opinions are the author's own; this blog is posted in the author's personal capacity. Available for reuse under Creative Commons 3.0 License. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/.

After Ten Years Of Beating His Wife, This Silicon Valley CEO Gets Less Than One Month In Jail.

This case is especially chilling because we are looking at an outwardly successful couple, in the land of high-tech startups, and there is an audio recording of one of the beatings, and he's talking about fixing a website very calmly while calling her a bitch and proceeding to hit her over and over again as she begs him to stop. (Warning: very upsetting.)

As outlined by career blogger Penelope Trunk in her article on this story, here are 4 risk factors for abuse (bullets are quoted):
  • Socioeconomic pressures
  • Low self-esteem
  • Untreated mental health issues
  • A lack of appropriate coping skills
Read Neha Rastogi's Victim Impact Statement here.

How does a wife-beater get only 30 days in jail?

To help other victims, potential and actual, please share this information widely.
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By Dannielle Blumenthal, Ph.D. All opinions are the author's own; this blog is posted in the author's personal capacity. Available for reuse under Creative Commons 3.0 License. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/.

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